Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Thirsty For... Moroccan Mint Tea

I've had a surprisingly difficult time finding a good, visual recipe for Moroccan Mint Tea until Thirsty For... released this video.



It's worth mentioning that the tea is poured from a height to aerate it and create the desirable froth in the tea cup.

5 comments:

  1. I have made Morrocan tea using that method, with the one exception that I didn't place the berrad on the stove to boil the tea; I just steeped it. I used Chinese gunpowder tea, but I had to compromise on the mint. I have not been able to find a source yet for fresh Nana Mint (Mentha spicata nana), the sub-species of mint they grow in North Africa, so I used regular spearmint (Mentha spicata).

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for this insight! I didn't recognize which mint they used and I was wondering about the heating of the berrad. I'm not inclined to boil tea, but I do wonder how well it would work on an electric stove. During a previous discussion, someone mentioned one occasion where two kinds of mint were used to make the tea during their visit to Morocco. They couldn't identify the varieties, but it might an interesting future experiment to try out variations of single mints and blends. I'm also curious to try out different gunpowder teas.

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    2. I don't think it would work well on an electric stove, but a portable butane burner might work. I do have some dried Nana Mint, and it does have a different flavor, and it would be interesting to do some taste comparisons.

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    3. I've burrowed through a number of discussions on the subject of the mint used in Moroccan Tea, focusing on those who have lived in or visited Morocco and the consensus seems to be that they use spearmint, or peppermint, or both depending on region. I did see several mentions of Nana Tea which is a tisane using just Nana Mint leaves. It would still be worthwhile to try Nana with Moroccan Mint Tea, as well. It's said to have a unique flavor.

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  2. The thing I'm calling Nana Mint is Mentha spicata nana, a sub-species of Spearmint (Mentha spicata), so both probably get called spearmint. Also, "nana" actually means "mint" in Hebrew and Arabic, which also leads to some confusion.

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